SAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK

WORK FROM: MASSART ART-ED

ARTIST-TEACHER STUDIO
The goal of this course is to support and assist students in the cultivation of a self-directed, contemporary studio practice.
This class is the final, required studio course for Art Ed Majors and typically taken while they student is completing their student teaching. It is designed to introduce professional practices as well as build upon the ID studio sequence of courses. 
The course aims to provide a real-world understanding of the time demands they will face once leaving the safety of school and provide them with tools and strategies to navigate these challenges. Throughout this course students face extreme demands upon their time and attention as they complete:
1| a new body of work.
2| the writing. research and design of an original studio-based curriculum.
3| 120 hours of student teaching.

KEY COURSE ELEMENTS:

  • PRACTICE: PROJECTS, WORK PRODUCED + DOCUMENTATION
    This encapsulates the active development of a critically engaged practice and cycle of production— over the course of the semester you will develop a personalized set of methods and strategies in order to cultivate an art-making practice that reflects your desires, ideas and interests. fueled and expanded by research, theory, discussion and critique Projects are expected to be completed and submitted/presented on the due date.  Any obstacles to timely completion of projects should be dealt with proactively in advance of the due date.In addition, this course will discuss foundational elements of a professional artistic practice: artist statements, bio blurbs, documentation of work, websites, exhibition applications, networking, communication + social media strategies. 

  • IDEATION, PLANNING, RESEARCH AND WRITING
    The generation and expansion of your work is a product of thinking across a range of disciplines, materials and processes. It is essential to investigate the origins of your ideas, the interdependence of meaning, thought, and expression in order to find the connections between your own art-making practice, the world outside your studio and the continuum of art history and art present. Ideation and research is most often assessed through brief written assignments, sketchbooks and critique. 

  • PRESENTATIONS, STUDIO VISITS + CRITIQUES
    Your presentation and discussion of your work and your process are vital facets of your art practice. Equally important is the way you engage, understand and discuss the work of other artists. Through individual in-class presentations, group critiques and 1-on-1 studio visits you become more confident and comfortable discussing and analyzing your own ideas about the processes, products and materials involved in contemporary art practice. Throughout this semester you will be asked to digest, dissect and discuss a range of contemporary practices as they relate to your own work and the works of your peers.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIO
The ID Studio sequence of courses form the studio hub for all Art Education students, it is the time and space dedicated to their personal artistic practice. are challenged to bring their life experiences and college-wide studies to a series of open ended prompts. This sequence of courses is supplemented and fed throughout their studies by enrolling in targeted Liberal Arts, Art History, and/or discipline specific Studio Electives. In this sequence of courses, concepts, ideas and research lead, as students are encouraged to explore a wide range of materials and processes to give form to them. 

WORK FROM: MASSART PRE-COLLEGE

WORK FROM: SCHOOL OF THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

DRAWING PORTFOLIO

Focusing on a minimal set of essential drawing skills, materials and techniques this class challenges participants to embrace both the traditional and contemporary applications of drawing.The first half of the course focuses on developing and employing a nexus skills and strategies in observational drawing: line, mark-making, perspective, use of value, composition, point of view, proportion + measurement and hinges upon the progression from sustained studies to resolved drawings.  The second half of the class will employ a cycle of open-ended assignments and critiques designed to challenge students, build upon established skills, and discover new approaches, processes and materials. A combination of focused activities, assignments, group demonstrations, critique and individualized in process instruction in order to cultivate a personal relationship to drawing as a means of thinking about, describing and synthesizing the perceived world and its relation to their practice as a whole. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

Composition

  • establish pictorial space (foreground, mid-ground and background)
  • make decisions regarding differing approaches to subject  
    • move beyond the neutral academic study, infusing drawings with a personal point of view
    • effectively use available paper real-estate 
    • create a greater interdependence between material, subject, scale and content
  • use composition evocatively, to infuse drawings with a sense of movement, mood or emotion

Proportion and scale

  • employ visual measurement techniques 
  • accurately represent relationships between an object’s length to width to height
  • represent proportional relationships between multiple objects within pictorial space
  • explore the scale of objects within the pictorial space 

mark-making + line

  • effectively employ descriptive line/marks (ex: contour, cross contour) 
  • effectively employ expressive lines/marks(ex: gesture)
  • explore and expand mark-making vocabulary 
  • use a combination of positive and reductive mark making appropriate to desired outcomes 
    • defining planes, differentiating surface textures, creation of volume or for purposes of expression

Value

  • make use of a full value range as dictated by material
  • make use of highlights and shadows to create believable volume and depth within an object
  • use value to describe weight and tension
  • evocatively use value— light and shadow for expression, depth or drama

 

ABSTRACTION, PROCESS AND FORMULATION

This course explores and exploits the transdisciplinarity of drawing, challenging participants to extend its practice and application beyond the boundaries of its traditional, institutional definition in pursuit its relevance to their own practice. While still often understood by it’s rawness, immediacy and essential use of material, contemporary applications of drawing have left behind its associations as a non-terminal medium and along with that any reliance on paper as its fundamental substrate. This shift allows drawing to be understood as a practice that spills over disciplinary borders—  fluidly engaging in dialog with painting, installation, writing, performance, sculpture, photography, video, dance, digital work and beyond. Progressing through a series of 4 ‘dialog modules’ students will develop individual concepts, processes and imagery while exploring a wide range of approaches, methods and materials. For each Dialog module work will take place both in and out of the classroom as students engage in: LOOKING / THINKING —slide shows and seminar style discussion, MAKING / PROCESS / RESEARCH —completion of projects as individual responses to module specific prompts, issues and approaches and finally REFLECTION —critique, writing and/or other critical dialog.


DIALOG ONE: line, mark, material, surface and substrate
DIALOG TWO: mindset, mapping, thinking, and planning,
DIALOG THREE: scale, space, place, structure and site
DIALOG FOUR: time, movement, action and performance.